LAMADUGH – A LAND OF SERENITY!

Lost somewhere in between the dense pine jungle of Old Manali, I and my buddies saw the Lion king rock from afar but the way to reach there was blocked due to a minor landslide which is a frequent sight in the mountains.

That’s when we heard a sound from the bushes. We got scared because earlier a local informed us about a bear that was spotted in the trek a few days ago but it was not what we were expecting.

The mountains did their magic and sent their cutest guide for our rescue. We saw an adorable mama dog wagging her tail and running towards us. She greeted us with all the love and kisses she had and took us to her pups who were hiding inside a small cave just below the Lion king rock. Those fluffy balls of love started jumping all around us inviting us to play with them. They filled us with happiness and unloaded all the fatigue from our bodies.

The view from Lion king rock was also mesmerising with beautiful glaciers on the horizon and the town of Manali beneath us. There was dead silence and in that silence, I could hear the mountains talking to me, urging me to stay in their lap. This was just a gist of the captivating sights and serenity the mountains had kept hidden for us.

We bid farewell to the pooches and started to move ahead. The climb was steep and melting snow made the path muddy and slippery which meant more hard work to reach the top.

There was a dramatic change in the surroundings, the dense thicket transformed into a lush green plain filled with alpine flowers. My mind wasn’t willing to believe what my eyes saw. Something so beautiful yet so tranquil. The serenity of Lamadugh enslaved my soul and the picturesque setting of the plains looked like a beautiful masterpiece created by mother nature.

I closed my eyes, raised my hands high up in the sky and took a deep breath of the fresh air in Manali. The breath-taking views of the different faces of Indrasan, Deo Tibba, and Bara Shangri glacier were the incentives we got for our efforts. I was asking myself “Is this all real or is this just a fantasy?”. My rendezvous with Lamadugh changed me as a person, it helped me realise the fact that happiness is not where you think it is and peace is nothing but freedom from your inner fears and boundaries. There’s more to human existence than material luxury and social status. It taught me how to deal with my mistakes, find my way in life and never stop moving forward no matter how difficult the journey gets.
This is the power of the mountains, they change your perspective towards life.

If you’re voluntary to rewrite yourself and dwell in the ataraxy of Lamadugh then here’s how you can reach this otherworldly tableland:

The starting point of the trek is easily visible. It exists near a water tank which is just a few minutes of a walk ahead of Hadimba Devi shrine. The trail is clear, well built which after a while gets narrower and turns deep inside the dense forest of Deodar and Pine trees which runs on the borders of the Manali wildlife sanctuary. The charm of this trek shortly wiped out the terror of the carnivores roaming in the wilderness from our minds. Cross the Lion king rock and keep moving upward till you reach a small but ravishing plateau. You can sit and recover your breath here amidst the equilibrium of the mountains. Lamadugh is just half an hour of an uphill hike away from this point.
Lamadugh is a deserted alpine plateau, untouched except for a small government made a hut for the shepherds and a thick growth of alpine flowers.

I feel blessed that our hunt for an offbeat place took us to one of the most enchanting treks we’ve ever been to.

Gurupreet Arora

Instagram Handle

https://www.instagram.com/_gurupreet__arora/

LE MORNE BRABANT MOUNTAIN

Located at the southwestern coast of Mauritius, this mountain is held close to the heart of Mauritians because of the formidable tale attached to it.

Le Morne Brabant has been registered as a UNESCO world heritage site in 2008 because of this very story.

For those who are unaware, our ancestors were brought to Mauritius as slaves and indentured labourers from Africa, India and China. Centuries ago, some of the slaves evaded capture and hid in Le Morne Brabant for days. After the abolition of slavery, On February 01, 1835, some soldiers and police went in search of these slaves to inform them that they were free men and women. The slaves misinterpreted the arrival of the police and were terrified of the idea of being caught by their ruthless masters. They jumped from the top of the mountain, choosing to be dead and free rather than being alive and owned. As a tribute to them, a cross has been built on the public beach situated at the foot of the mountain.

Le Morne Brabant is only 555m above sea level and it takes about 1 hour and 30 minutes to get to the summit. However, the steepness and loose gravels on the way up to, add a little spice to the difficulty level of the climb. For these reasons, the trail is closed during rainy days.

The views on the blue lagoon throughout the climb can only be described as picturesque. I climbed this mountain in summer when it was about 32°C. When we would get tired, the thought of how our ancestors went through this path barefoot, without food or even a single drop of water kept us going. I remember how other hikers got discouraged about halfway up and went back saying that the descent will be more challenging as it was about to rain. However, when hiking and travelling, it is more reliable to trust your instinct than following others.

We continued our way up and the satisfaction of reaching the top of the summit despite all the challenges we faced from the start of the journey, was fulfilling. Just like the slaves won over their masters, we won over our fears and doubt.

A true feeling of victory.

The cross is often a religious symbol but the one at the top of the summit is a sign of recognition for the choice of freedom made by the slaves. Though many would find it controversial and offending, I climbed the cross to express the respect I have for my ancestors. As I stood there with my hands stretched out, the winds blowing all around gave me a sense of freedom and joy. The freedom to be true to yourself, despite others trying to impose their thoughts and beliefs on you. The joy of reaching your final destination. Maybe that’s how my ancestors too, felt in that moment when they jumped. 

Kavina Iyavoo

Instagram Handle

https://www.instagram.com/skiytoearth/

TRAVEL TO LIVE BUT NOT ALWAYS FOR A LIVING

Travel is simple yet so vast. He had seen a bit of the world and the worldly ways. He understood life is a cycle when you start somewhere you have to reach the end. But he always enjoyed the journey in between. It is always the journey that pulls him towards the unknown. He loves striking a conversation whenever he is travelling, he loves looking people at the airport, albeit it sounds strange but he loves it. He thinks there are so many people travelling for so many reasons.
Aren’t we all travelling? We have been travelling since the inception he understood it now. He knows this cycle will never end. He travels for exposure, knowledge and experience. But the most important thing he travels for is wisdom and quietude. It is strange, he loves meeting people in his travels but he seeks solitude and prefers to be alone.
Sipping incessant cups of chai with different people, sniffing and drinking freshly brewed coffee with some delicious cookies at a cafe, walking the narrow streets, smelling trees and plants while climbing the mountains, he loves it all. He lives to witness this world. Travel for him is not a choice, neither an option. It is a necessity. A need to evolve his soul and grow, a need to nurture his passion and the need to unite with the universe. He travels not just to observe or for recreation. He travels to live but not always for a living.

DHUNDI VILLAGE – TREKKING IN AVALANCHE AREA

Sitting with three of my likeminded friends in a room in Palchan, a small village situated 11 km ahead of Manali, we were talking about places to explore nearby. We didn’t plan this trip, we just followed the tune of nature and synchronised our movement rhythmically, that is rather summing up sophisticatedly for an excuse by teenagers who have no clue about life.

That’s when we came across something called ’Dhundi’. Dhundi is the last village in Solang Valley and closest to the Beas river. It witnesses the intersection of the mighty Beas river with its first tributary originating from the Beas Kund and the Rohtang Pass respectively. It is also the first village from the south portal of the Rohtang tunnel, which is now called the ‘Atal Tunnel’.

Our hotel was adjacent to the Palchan bridge and Dhundi was around 10-11 km ahead of us. So we decided to visit Dhundi next day and fell asleep all excited. The next day I woke up at 7 am and the temperature was -10 degrees Celsius and the sun hid behind the mountains, maybe a little angry with us for not getting up on time to see it’s first rays.

With that thought, I forcefully woke my friends up and we headed towards Solang Ski and Ropeway Centre. We were stopped by the Border Road Organisation’s ranger, who at first was very friendly but as soon as we told him about our destination, got a bit sceptical. We asked him the way to Dhundi to which he replied – Bhai Ji, you have already crossed Dhundi and there is no village named Dhundi ahead. But when it comes to travelling, we need to rely on our instincts, so we found an alternative route other than the metal road because before proper roads were made, the Himachali people used hidden trails in the mountains to travel.

We eventually were treading on a rock trail which was on the outer edge of the mountain but gradually curved into a narrow trail which led us to a pine forest. Suddenly we were amidst a thick blanket of snow and we had lost it. Each step we took made us feel heavy than the previous one because the snow got inside our shoes making them wet and heavy. We thought this is probably our last trek.

Our trail suddenly ended on what I think was an intersection of two adjoining mountains, it forced us to take a left to find us ourselves in the middle of a snug waterfall flowing over the trail we were supposed to take. We were stuck again. One of my friends went to look out for an alternate trail but came back disappointed.

There was only one way to cross and that was to jump on the other side. Luckily we found a tree to grab onto so we land safely. So I jumped first and barely caught it because my feet slipped, I quickly cleared away the snow from the landing spot for my friends to jump. We came back close to the highway and clearly saw the intersection of our trail and we all were pleased to see the road again but it was short-lived. We heard a rumbling sound and found ourselves looking at two big boulders tumbling down from the mountain bringing with them kind of a mini avalanche just a few hundred metres ahead of us. We never had an experience like this before feeling so helpless in front of nature. All we could do was to run for our life. We discussed taking the road back to Palchan.

But we didn’t come this close to go back without entering Dhundi.

After a kilometre, we saw a partially completed tunnel just next to a tunnel which was entirely destroyed by a landslide. After crossing the tunnel and covering another kilometre, we saw massive cranes, excavators and road rollers. We found the supervisor of these massive machines and asked him about the place. He told us we were near Dhundi. He asked us about how we got here, so we told him about the ranger and the trail we found. 

He blatantly told us – you shouldn’t have taken the trail because this whole area is an avalanche and landslide prone area and in the winter months this place is unpredictable.

Tourist cars need prior permission before entering this area and that too on a very tight come and go schedule because there can be an avalanche anytime”. He was clearing the highway which was blocked by a landslide which struck 3 days before we visited. He also told us to return before it gets dark because temperature reaches as low as -20° Celsius in the evening itself.

I looked at my watch, the time was 1:30 pm and we still had 2 kilometres to cover so we increased our pace and reached the Dhundi bridge. 

Being a snow-fed river in Solang Valley region, the Beas river was almost frozen and there wasn’t too much water so we decided to find the intersection point following the river and we were successful.

Two rivers with water as so clear that even the tiniest of the pebbles on the riverbed was visible to the naked eye. As soon as I reached the intersection, I removed my gloves, sat beside the Beas river, dipped my hands in the icy cold water and took a sip of the cleanest water that I ever drank in my entire life and probably the cleanest water in the entire Himachal Pradesh at that moment.

We were walking on snow that nobody had walked on for months. We were finding solid ground by poking a long stick in the fresh snow.

There were massive rocks in the then dried up Beas river which we used to sit and admire the beautiful scenery that Dhundi showed us. We found a perfectly elevated rock to sit and admire the view.

We were completely isolated. During sub zero temperature, the villagers of Dhundi go to a lower region and make a temporary settlement to be safe from avalanches and landslides. So it was just us, the endless mountains and the crystal clear Beas river flowing beneath us.

This was the most thrilling and the most frightening adventure of my life.

From jumping over a waterfall in the edge of a mountain to witnessing an avalanche in front of my eyes. This adventure made me rethink our existence.

How easily our life could be taken from us.

We should live life to the fullest and do what our heart says because life could be unpredictable. 

So travel as much as you can and as soon as you can.

Gurupreet Arora

WE BELONG TO NATURE!

Nature does not belong to us, we belong to nature.
Have you ever wondered why people find happiness and solitude in travelling?
Humans have been nomads since ancient times, and it has been our trait from time immemorial. Our natural instinct was always to roam, stay close to nature and adapt to our surroundings. It always brought peace to that instinct and self-satisfaction to the soul. Hikes and treks have become the new means of that part of seeking ourselves.
No mineral water bottles. Drink from springs and streams, do not worry if it isn’t a renowned brand. Be a part of nature. It is okay to sweat, it is okay to get some bruises, it is alright to not bath for a few days, to try new stuff, to meet new people while travelling, to caress the dogs that lead your path. Be Kind. Let us be humble and grateful for all we are offered by the mother Earth.
The whole purpose of travel is to become a better person and establish a bond with nature which is now somehow diluted due to all the modernization surrounding us. When in the lap of nature, let us try to be as sustainable as possible.

Nirvan sah

Instagram handle:

https://www.instagram.com/theguyfromhimalaya/

WHY DOES HE TRAVEL TO THE MOUNTAINS?

Screenshot_2020-06-21 R O B I N ( cliffclimber_) • Instagram photos and videos

According to him, the Mountains are the best places on Earth to go for an adventure. He can be completely free and is able to do many activities in the Mountains. From nature walks, hiking, camping, trekking, rock climbing, mountain biking, paragliding and much more.
He loves to indulge in one or more of these activities whenever he travels to the mountains because it fills his soul with simplicity, adventure and joy.

He Travels to the Mountains because he constantly wants to appreciate the beauty of nature, and he thinks that Mountains are the best creation of God. Trees, river, lakes, glaciers, birds and animals – he loves everything which makes these mountains worth admiring.
He travels to the mountains because he just wants to sit on a cliff and be thankful to Mahadeva for the blessings and got a chance to live this life and witness his beautiful creation.
He Travels to the Mountains because he wants to know himself, he is curious to know his strengths and weaknesses, the more time he spends in the mountains, the more he gets to know about himself.

ROBIN RAO

THE INNER OUTDOORS APPAREL!

We know it’s irritating not to be able to go for our adventures these days, but it’s alright, when the time is right we want you to wear how you feel about the world of outdoors. We have launched our apparel. Let us know which design excites you the most?
Comment and tell us.

LET’S GO

Over ice, I’m freezing
Beautiful eyes, deceiving
We may die this evening
Coughing, wheezing, bleeding
High, I’m an anxious soul
Blood moons are my eyes, stay low
Red and black, they glow
Under attack, in my soul
When it’s my time, I’ll know
Never seen a hell so cold
Yeah, we’ll make it out, I’ll know
We’ll run right through the flames, let’s go.

Gurupreet Arora

Instagram Handle:

https://www.instagram.com/_gurupreet__arora/

ALL LIVES MATTER/BLACK LIVES MATTER

It is disheartening to hear what is happening around the world. Please think hard and know that we are all one. How much anger is creeped within us to take someone’s life? What kind of anger is this? We have no right to form a judgment on someone’s colour, race or ethnicity. All lives are important and all lives matter, but at this moment it is crucial to understand and completely empathise with the black people in the world. We take this time for solidarity with all the black people in the world. We completely apologise for what has happened.
Here are some black Olympian’s who have won medals in Winter Olympics and have made significant contributions to the world of adventure sports.


1. Akwasi Frimpong: Ghana’s second athlete to ever compete in the Winter Olympics.


2. Shani Davis: one of the most decorated long track speed skaters with four Olympic medals in his belt.


3. Sabrina Simader: first person from Kenya to compete in alpine skiing. The only athlete who represented Kenya at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.


4. Maame Biney: an American, originally from Ghana. The first black woman to make the Olympic speed skating team and only the second African American born athlete to represent the U.S. in the Winter Olympics.


5. Erin Jackson: qualified for the 2018 Winter Olympics after learning how to speed skate just four months prior. The first black woman to be on the U.S. long track team.

A big salute to all of you from and a message to all from us – WE ARE ALL ONE.

Image credits – Getty Images

HAUNTED TRAILS OR BLESSED SHANGRI-LA

It was as if almost all our lives could be played on a recorder and fast-forwarded to this moment

Every onset and eventuality in the journey of life was nothing, but a step further towards it. As if the whole life is a mountain and this moment is the peak.

This moment of the first sight I experienced, the sight of Kanchendzonga. 

As if all our lives are waves of a thoughtless storm and Kanchendzonga is the shore.
Everything that has happened and un-happened, everyone I became and un–became, was one step closer towards this calling. As if all the paths I have ever walked upon were to reach the peak of this moment called Kanchendzonga.

These were my raw thoughts, overwhelmed by the first sight of this mountain. I gently closed my diary and capped my pen. Without reading any of it. It was not just a mountain for me, for those who have seen Kanchendzonga, would know it. For those who haven’t, may jolly well conclude that I am batshit crazy and that’s okay. In that moment, which loomed for hours unknown, the clear blue sky gave way to the crimson evening. The winds were in a cold hurry and so was I, It was getting dark.

We were in a group of 10, but I sneaked some time out to spend alone. My fellow trekkers led the way forward, while I decided to meditate in ‘woods and words’. Before leaving, Indranil, our trip leader, reiterated that I need to follow the single trailed–steep path, downhill.

Jolted by a sense of delay, I jumped to grab my belongings. My cold hands surrendered to the freeze quickly, while I still tried to fasten my backpack. One last look, before I hit the mysterious jungle. Mount Pandim (21,952 feet) and Kanchendzonga (28,169.29 Feet), overlooked the sun-kissed grass. Autumn colours made the wild fields look like a palette of reds and oranges, cheerily mixed with green.
I finally picked up my backpack and tripod, when Indranil’s last words rang in my head – “Be careful. No matter what, do not venture inside the jungle. Stick to your trail until you reach a river, that’s our campsite.

I entered the Rhododendron jungle. Thick moss comfortably wrapped thin branches, illuminated by the fading sun. The wind stealthily whizzed through the branches, making the jungle alive, as though breathing. The loose rocks made the downhill steep–unladed path a careful affair. I was carrying my camera on the tripod head. In non-photographic language, it simply means that I did not have the luxury to fall. Thus, began my journey into the labyrinth.

Haunted Trails:

As feet follow the trail, the mind follows another. Even before I realised it, I was in the middle of the “haunted” trails of Goechala.

Goechala is said to be so enchanting that wayfarers lose the sense of reality here. The trail earns a notorious name because many trekkers have lost their way here. In yesteryear, a guide followed a bird, blood pheasant, and lost his way in the jungle, while crossing the Phedang trail. What started as a little detour to click the picture of a bird, led him to the heart of the wilderness and he could not retrace his footsteps back to the trail. Only when a local search and rescue operation was launched, was he found in the jungle, completely hazed and clueless about his whereabouts. 

Several other people have been lured and ventured into the forest. Some found and some never to be seen again. But my fate did not swing in between these possibilities. I was certain about the trail and rejected any urge to stop. Well, until I looked back. The entangled Rhododendron branches gleamed fluorescent. The green moss spread across the barren crimson sky. Now that’s a photographer’s problem, give us a frame like that and we can’t help but drool. A couple of shots to feed the photographer and bit of artistic angles to keep the writer happy and like a fool, we’d think every shot is a National Geographic entry. 

I resumed my quest with a smile. As it started getting dark, winds became strong. As if someone is blowing them freely. This led me to believe that I am not alone. Suddenly the jungle was breathing heavier, as evening settled in. I still had a long way to reach Kockchurang.

Once upon a time, an old man walked the same path. This sleepy watchguard, who lives alone in the middle of nowhere, in a place called Thansing. Imagine a huge clearing of miles and miles of barren land. A lone man, igniting a bonfire, in a lonely cottage. Every-day. This is how Chacha has always lived. At least since the past 25 years that my people know him for. His human interaction is limited to the trek season of 4 to 5 months. Every year, when people meet him and he’d be there; just like the last year. Just like the trekker’s hut, the river and the mountains. The forest and the wild. Timeless. Simply maddening a tad more, with every passing season. So here’s Chacha’s story. The old man was helping a group of lost trekkers to cross the jungle. It was about to be dark and Chacha decided to return to his cottage in Thansing. They say,  while hiking alone, he too could hear the jungle breathing. They say, he saw something unfathomable. And he ran, ran all the way to save his life. Rumours of a Yeti not only spread soon but are alive till date.

Weaving these thoughts, I didn’t even realise that I could see a giant figure at the far distance. Waving at me. It was Indranil. And I was home!

My home somehow pictured like this. There was an old trekker’s hut. A brook quietly made its way by the side. A quaint wooden bridge arched over the brook. The brook and the bridge, in eternal companionship, holding hands against the “haunted” trekker’s hut. I crossed the bridge and hugged my fellow trekkers like they were the only family I ever had! Now, that’s the thing about travel, it bonds you beyond blood and brotherhood.

Just a few steps after crossing the bridge is a cliff, perfectly edged. A muffled roar of the Prek–Chu river far below, touched its feet! I sat there for a while, thinking about how this place truly resembles Shangri–la. 

Shangri–la:

Many refer to Goechala as the last Shangri–la. Khangchendzonga translates to five repositories of God’s treasure. It is a prevalent belief that this treasure is hidden in the mountains around Yuksom. These mountains are also said to hide the secret gateway to Shangri–la that will be revealed to the right person at the right time. I wonder if all these lost souls, find their secret gate to the other world and decide never to come back? If these people were the right people, present at the right time, to stumble upon the magical world? Here’s a small legend a little monk once narrated: 

An old monk knew the way to the magical valley of Shangri–la. He even possessed a detailed map to reach the valley. However, he was the last bearer of this information. Tempted by this idea, powerful nincompoops of that era chased the old monk. All in vain! The monk reached Shangri–la valley and jumped off the cliff. Thereafter, nobody was able to find it. I shuddered at this possibility. 

Breaking my stream of thoughts, I could hear a distant chatter. Indranil was sharing the tale of the haunted hut in Kockchurang.

Years ago, a German and a French man lived together in the hut. Eventually, the French man murdered the German and absconded. Ever since then, the hut is said to be haunted by the good Samaritan German ghost, who flashes a torch through the window past midnight, cutting through the darkness. It’s spooky how long ago, Indranil regardless spent a night there. Alone.

The Shangri–la within:

The saga is unending. These mysteries will continue for an aeon. That is what makes Goechala truly magical. I wish I could go back to myself in the moment when I first saw Kanchendzonga and tell myself that this moment was my Shangri–la! Maybe, we all carry our Shangri–la within, only to be revealed at the right time! 

Itinerary:

If it calls you, this itinerary is your way to Shangri–la:

Day 1: New Jalpaiguri railway station/Bagdogra Airport to Yuksom

Day 2: Yuksom local Acclimatization

Day 3: Yuksom (5800 feet) to Sachen (7250feet). 4 hours

Day 4: Sachen (7,200 feet) – Tshoka (9,650 feet). 3–4 hours

Day 5: Tshoka (9,650 feet)- Dzongri(12,980 feet) via Phedang(12,050 feet). 5-6 hours

Day 6: Dzongri (12980 feet) to Dzongri top (13681 feet) and back

Day 7: Dzongri(12980 feet) to Thansing(12894 feet) via Kockchurang(12096 feet).5-6 hours

Day 8: Thansing(12894 feet) to Lamuney(13,693 feet). 4.2 kms and 2 hours

Day 9: Lamuney(13,693 feet) to Goechala(16,000feet) and back to Kockchurang.10-12 hours

Day 10: Kockchurang to Tshoka via Phedang. 6-7 hours

Day 11: Tshoka to Yuksom via Bakhim and Sachen. 6 hours

Day 12: Departure

AMBIKA BHARDWAJ